Posts Tagged "cloud"

Cirrus & Cirrostratus

Posted by on May 20, 2011 in phenomena | 28 comments

Cirrus & Cirrostratus

Groningen, Netherlands.

Cirrus clouds are the most common of the high clouds. They are composed of ice and consist of long, thin, wispy streamers. Cirrus clouds are usually white and predict fair weather. Sometimes called mares tails, they stream with the wind. By watching the movement of cirrus clouds you can tell from which direction weather is approaching. The appearance of cirrus clouds usually indicates that a change in weather will occur within 24 hours.

Cirrostratus are sheetlike, thin clouds that usually cover the entire sky. The sun or moon can shine through Cirrostratus clouds. Cirrostratus clouds usually come 12-24 hours before a rain or snow storm.

{boatsafe.com, picture of Bas Kers}

related mobileGRIB variables: Cloud Cover, Temperature, Precipitation, Wind arrows

 

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Nimbostratus

Posted by on May 15, 2011 in phenomena | 15 comments

Nimbostratus

Tweet Heads, Australia.

Nimbostratus clouds are dark gray with a ragged base. Rain or snow is associated with Nimbostratus clouds.

{boatsafe.com, picture from mustang00069}

A Nimbostratus cloud is characterized by a formless cloud layer that is almost uniformly dark gray. “Nimbo” is from the Latin word “nimbus”, which denotes precipitation. It is a low to middle-level (family D1) stratiform cloud with some vertical extent that produces precipitation, developing cloud bases between the surface and 10000 ft (3000 m). This cloud typically forms from altostratus in the middle altitude range then subsides into the low altitude range during precipitation. Nimbostratus usually has a thickness of 2000 meters. In rare cases, Nimbostratus can be very thin and accompanied by a separate layer of altostratus divided by a cloudless layer. Though found worldwide, nimbostratus is found more commonly in the middle latitudes.

{Wikipedia}

related mobileGRIB variables: Total Cloud Cover, Precipitation

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Altocumulus Lenticularis

Posted by on May 11, 2011 in phenomena | 33 comments

Altocumulus Lenticularis

Otura, Granada.
Lenticular clouds are stationary lens-shaped clouds that form at high altitudes, normally aligned perpendicular to the wind direction. Lenticular clouds can be separated into altocumulus standing lenticularis (ACSL), stratocumulus standing lenticular (SCSL), and cirrocumulus standing lenticular (CCSL). Due to their shape, they are often mistaken for Unidentified Flying Objects (UFOs).
{Wikipedia, picture of nchazarra}
related mobileGRIB variables: Total Cloud Cover

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Altostratus

Posted by on May 11, 2011 in phenomena | 4 comments

Altostratus

Treachery Beach, Seal Rocks, Australia.

Altostratus is a cloud belonging to a class characterized by a generally uniform gray to bluish-gray sheet or layer, lighter in color than nimbostratus and darker than cirrostratus. The sun can be seen through thin altostratus, but thicker layers can be quite opaque. They can look similar to lower altitude stratus clouds.
Altostratus clouds are formed by the rising of a large air mass that condenses into a cloud. They can produce light precipitation, often in the form of virga. If the precipitation increases in persistence and intensity, the altostratus cloud may thicken into nimbostratus.

{Wikipedia, picture of dumbat}

related mobileGRIB variable: Total Cloud Cover, Pressure, Isotherm (coming soon)


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Cumulonimbus

Posted by on May 9, 2011 in phenomena | 1 comment

Cumulonimbus

Port Sheldon, USA.

Cumulonimbus are generally known as thunderstorm clouds. High winds will flatten the top of the cloud into an anvil-like shape. Cumulonimbus are associated with heavy rain, snow, hail, lightning, and tornadoes. The anvil usually points in the direction the storm is moving.

{boatsafe.com, picture of ER}

 

 

related mobileGRIB variable: Total Cloud Cover, Pressure


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