Posts Tagged "Pressure"

Cyclonic Storm

Posted by on Sep 16, 2011 in phenomena | 5 comments

Cyclonic Storm

In meteorology, a cyclone is an area of closed, circular fluid motion rotating in the same direction as the Earth. This is usually characterized by inward spiraling winds that rotate counter clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere of the Earth. Most large-scale cyclonic circulations are centered on areas of low atmospheric pressure. The largest low-pressure systems are cold-core polar cyclones and extratropical cyclones which lie on the synoptic scale. Warm-core cyclones such as tropical cyclones, mesocyclones, and polar lows lie within the smaller mesoscale. Subtropical cyclones are of intermediate size. Upper level cyclones can exist without the presence of a surface low, and can pinch off from the base of the Tropical Upper Tropospheric Trough during the summer months in the Northern Hemisphere. Cyclones have also been seen on extraterrestrial planets, such as Mars and Neptune.

{Wikipedia}

related mobileGRIB variables: Pressure, Wind

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Hurricane Danielle

Posted by on May 11, 2011 in phenomena | 1 comment

Hurricane Danielle

Courtesy of NASA.

It was the first of four Category 4 hurricanes during the 2010 Atlantic hurricane season. The sixth tropical depression, fourth named storm, second hurricane, and first major hurricane of the season, Danielle developed as a typical Cape Verde-type hurricane from a tropical wave on August 21. Quickly intensifying, the new tropical depression became a tropical storm eighteen hours after formation on August 22, and it reached category 2 on August 24. Also on August 24, Hurricane Danielle weakened back to a category 1 hurricane, but it returned to category 2 strength on August 25. Further intensification occurred and Danielle became a Category 4 hurricane with peak winds of 135 miles per hour (217 km/h) on August 27. It then weakened, and finally dissipated on August 30. The hurricane was the first in a rapid succession of eleven named storms, which ended in late September.

{Wikipedia}

related mobileGRIB variables: Total Cloud Cover, Pressure, Wind Arrows


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Altostratus

Posted by on May 11, 2011 in phenomena | 4 comments

Altostratus

Treachery Beach, Seal Rocks, Australia.

Altostratus is a cloud belonging to a class characterized by a generally uniform gray to bluish-gray sheet or layer, lighter in color than nimbostratus and darker than cirrostratus. The sun can be seen through thin altostratus, but thicker layers can be quite opaque. They can look similar to lower altitude stratus clouds.
Altostratus clouds are formed by the rising of a large air mass that condenses into a cloud. They can produce light precipitation, often in the form of virga. If the precipitation increases in persistence and intensity, the altostratus cloud may thicken into nimbostratus.

{Wikipedia, picture of dumbat}

related mobileGRIB variable: Total Cloud Cover, Pressure, Isotherm (coming soon)


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Cumulonimbus

Posted by on May 9, 2011 in phenomena | 1 comment

Cumulonimbus

Port Sheldon, USA.

Cumulonimbus are generally known as thunderstorm clouds. High winds will flatten the top of the cloud into an anvil-like shape. Cumulonimbus are associated with heavy rain, snow, hail, lightning, and tornadoes. The anvil usually points in the direction the storm is moving.

{boatsafe.com, picture of ER}

 

 

related mobileGRIB variable: Total Cloud Cover, Pressure


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Cumulonimbus vespéral

Posted by on May 9, 2011 in phenomena | 4 comments

Cumulonimbus vespéral

Isolated cumulonimbus cloud on eastern Lot-et-Garonne seen from La Sauvetat (Gers, SW France). The anvil is slowly extended by high-level NW wind. September 2, 2010.

{picture and description from Pierre-Paul Feyte}

Cumulonimbus are generally known as thunderstorm clouds. High winds will flatten the top of the cloud into an anvil-like shape. Cumulonimbus are associated with heavy rain, snow, hail, lightning, and tornadoes. The anvil usually points in the direction the storm is moving.

{boatsafe.com}

 

mobileGRIB variable: Total Cloud Cover, Pressure


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