Posts Tagged "Total Cloud Cover"

Nimbostratus

Posted by on May 15, 2011 in phenomena | 15 comments

Nimbostratus

Tweet Heads, Australia.

Nimbostratus clouds are dark gray with a ragged base. Rain or snow is associated with Nimbostratus clouds.

{boatsafe.com, picture from mustang00069}

A Nimbostratus cloud is characterized by a formless cloud layer that is almost uniformly dark gray. “Nimbo” is from the Latin word “nimbus”, which denotes precipitation. It is a low to middle-level (family D1) stratiform cloud with some vertical extent that produces precipitation, developing cloud bases between the surface and 10000 ft (3000 m). This cloud typically forms from altostratus in the middle altitude range then subsides into the low altitude range during precipitation. Nimbostratus usually has a thickness of 2000 meters. In rare cases, Nimbostratus can be very thin and accompanied by a separate layer of altostratus divided by a cloudless layer. Though found worldwide, nimbostratus is found more commonly in the middle latitudes.

{Wikipedia}

related mobileGRIB variables: Total Cloud Cover, Precipitation

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Altocumulus Lenticularis

Posted by on May 11, 2011 in phenomena | 33 comments

Altocumulus Lenticularis

Otura, Granada.
Lenticular clouds are stationary lens-shaped clouds that form at high altitudes, normally aligned perpendicular to the wind direction. Lenticular clouds can be separated into altocumulus standing lenticularis (ACSL), stratocumulus standing lenticular (SCSL), and cirrocumulus standing lenticular (CCSL). Due to their shape, they are often mistaken for Unidentified Flying Objects (UFOs).
{Wikipedia, picture of nchazarra}
related mobileGRIB variables: Total Cloud Cover

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Hurricane Danielle

Posted by on May 11, 2011 in phenomena | 1 comment

Hurricane Danielle

Courtesy of NASA.

It was the first of four Category 4 hurricanes during the 2010 Atlantic hurricane season. The sixth tropical depression, fourth named storm, second hurricane, and first major hurricane of the season, Danielle developed as a typical Cape Verde-type hurricane from a tropical wave on August 21. Quickly intensifying, the new tropical depression became a tropical storm eighteen hours after formation on August 22, and it reached category 2 on August 24. Also on August 24, Hurricane Danielle weakened back to a category 1 hurricane, but it returned to category 2 strength on August 25. Further intensification occurred and Danielle became a Category 4 hurricane with peak winds of 135 miles per hour (217 km/h) on August 27. It then weakened, and finally dissipated on August 30. The hurricane was the first in a rapid succession of eleven named storms, which ended in late September.

{Wikipedia}

related mobileGRIB variables: Total Cloud Cover, Pressure, Wind Arrows


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Altostratus

Posted by on May 11, 2011 in phenomena | 4 comments

Altostratus

Treachery Beach, Seal Rocks, Australia.

Altostratus is a cloud belonging to a class characterized by a generally uniform gray to bluish-gray sheet or layer, lighter in color than nimbostratus and darker than cirrostratus. The sun can be seen through thin altostratus, but thicker layers can be quite opaque. They can look similar to lower altitude stratus clouds.
Altostratus clouds are formed by the rising of a large air mass that condenses into a cloud. They can produce light precipitation, often in the form of virga. If the precipitation increases in persistence and intensity, the altostratus cloud may thicken into nimbostratus.

{Wikipedia, picture of dumbat}

related mobileGRIB variable: Total Cloud Cover, Pressure, Isotherm (coming soon)


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Cumulonimbus

Posted by on May 9, 2011 in phenomena | 1 comment

Cumulonimbus

Port Sheldon, USA.

Cumulonimbus are generally known as thunderstorm clouds. High winds will flatten the top of the cloud into an anvil-like shape. Cumulonimbus are associated with heavy rain, snow, hail, lightning, and tornadoes. The anvil usually points in the direction the storm is moving.

{boatsafe.com, picture of ER}

 

 

related mobileGRIB variable: Total Cloud Cover, Pressure


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